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ENG 101: Writing I, Dr. Ian Stapley: Research Essay

This is a guide to help you find resources for your library assignments in this class.

Search For Background Information

First search for background information using a reference database.

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Credo is an easy-to-use tool for starting research. Use this box to search hundreds of full-text reference titles, as well as 500,000+ images and audio files and over 1,000 videos.

Reference Entry Example - Consumption

In economic terms, consumption is the intended endpoint of production. Within capitalism, goods and services are produced, exchanged and consumed (supply) in response to demand. It has been argued that the body has become another object of consumption: this may refer to what we buy to adorn ourselves (clothing); a particular way of living we may ‘buy’ into (performativity); or it can refer to the ways in which we may package, present and sell ourselves to the world (Habitus, Identity).

"Consumption." SAGE Key Concepts series: Key Concepts in Body and Society, Kate Cregan, Sage UK, 1st edition, 2012. Credo Reference, https://niagaracc.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/sageukbody/consumption/0?institutionId=2764.

Reference Entry Example - Consumerism

Originally an American term describing the doctrine that a stable economy is conditional on continuous growth of goods and services, consumerism is now used far more broadly to refer to individuals' patterns of expenditure – often within market societies where particular social premiums are placed on the consumption of constant product and service innovation. In its contemporary use the term often has pejorative connotations as when associated with the belief that happiness in a modern society is inextricably linked with the number and quality of goods and services consumed.

Consumerism raises a number of difficult questions for companies aspiring to social responsibility: are our products and services ‘useful’ to society; what are their social, environmental or other effects; do we market our products responsibly; are the patterns of consumerism we promote sustainable or responsible? The relationship between consumerism and sustainable consumption is particularly vexed.

Sabapathy, J. (2010). Consumerism. In W. Visser, D. Matten, M. Pohl, & et. al., The a to z of corporate social responsibility (2nd ed.). Wiley. Credo Reference: https://niagaracc.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/wileyazcsr/consumerism/0?institutionId=2764

Search

Search for your topic in the search box below or through a database linked on this page. 

If you click "peer-reviewed journals" you will refine your results to scholarly content. 

Search Term Ideas

  • Anti-consumerism
  • Consumer
  • Consumerism
  • Consumption (economics)
  • Economic inequality
  • Environmentalism
  • Ethical consumerism
  • Green politics
  • Overconsumption 
  • Social responsibility 
  • Sustainability 
  • Sustainable consumption
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